Electrical – minor details

The least important stuff always arrives in the mail first.

1972 CB350 Rear brake light cover

As mentioned there were three identified electrical related issues with this bike. The rear brake light cover was smashed, the indicators didn’t flash and the front brake switch didn’t trigger the brake light.

In the mail today was a replacement cover for the brake light and a new relay for the indicators. Kinda handy really as I’m working tonight and don’t have a lot of time, but a few minutes in the garage saw the new relay plugged in and working, and the brake light cover replaced (total cost of both parts shipped came to $50CDN – almost half of that was shipping).


1972 CB350 Rear brake light cover

This was a so-so item on the list. I wasn’t sure if I was keeping the stock brake light arrangement, but figured what the heck as I was already ordering the relay and the brake light cover was $12.

1972 CB350 Rear brake light cover

I’ve disassembled the front headlight/kill switch/brake lever assembly and have not quite figured out what the hell I’m looking at. So at this point that remains the sole remaining “known” issue with the electrical.

(Chrome cleaned up nice back there, didn’t it?)

More updates as they’re available.

6 comments

  1. Pieter says:

    If I’m reading this right, there should be a little switch behind the lever arm.
    When the lever is pulled in, the deadman button is released.
    As least that’s how it is on my bikes.

  2. Mugwug says:

    Yep… that’s how I figured it works, but can’t locate that switch despite dismantling the whole contraption. It’s kinda odd, but I’ll post some photos of the arrangement when I get a few minutes.

  3. Madeye says:

    My recollection accords with Pieter’s … when the brake lever is pulled, the button in the microswitch located in the brake level bracket pops out, closing the brake light circuit.

    The part is small, but rather obvious. But … as I posted previously, check the wiring diagram for colour codes – if, as you say, there are a couple of loose wires on the handlebar, it’s possible that switch assembly has been removed, or chopped off :-(

    If memory serves, the cable for that switch feeds through the same switchgear cavity as the kill/start switch cable.

    But, even if that front brake light switch assembly is missing, it’s not a very expensive part.

  4. Mugwug says:

    Yeah, there are two wires that have been cut short and end just above the instruments. I can’t locate the brake light switch, so it is possible it’s failed/been removed/etc and the wires are for it.

    I’ll check the wiring diagram I have and see if that’s the case, if so I’ll have to obtain the part and splice those wires. No biggie. It’s nice to see stuff working properly on the bike.

  5. Rick Seymour says:

    It does my heart good to see such “TLC” and in depth mechanical technique being applied to the old 350 … then again, you’re an Ingerman … no half measures.

    And of course you’ll find that obtaining replacement parts where needed, and reworking critical connections plays out way better than duct tape. ;-)

    Rick

  6. Mugwug says:

    Hey Rick!

    Well, when it comes to the Ingermans I’m lagging behind Matti and my brother Piet in mechanical aptitude. A shortcoming this project was meant to address, so I’m definately feeling my way along as I go.

    I’m having fun with it though, and at least now my garage smells appropriately of oil and gas (which seems to be as it should be). I look forward to each task on the list, and the slow pace is handy on my bank account as the replacement bits and bobs roll in.

    I’m not keeping a strict accounting (I’ve got a list on the whiteboard out in the garage) but we’re now past the $1,000 mark (that’s new tires/tubes front and back, new battery, new brake pads, new chain, and a laundry list of little parts) which includes the cost of the bike itself and transporting it back here.

    Don’t worry, I’m taking good care of her, and updates here should show how she’s doing with some regularity.

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